Adventure, Beer, Career aspirations, Career frustrations, Food, General ramblings, law, Life goals, Luxembourg, New adventure, Pupillage, Training contract, Travel, Travel writing, Trips, Wanna be Barrister

Trip 5: Luxembourg (and Germany, again)

This #atripamonth idea has been a great thing for me, providing something to regularly look forward to, it’s helped get me through the tedium and banality of day-to-day paralegal perjury; the stress and disappointment of pupillage applications, interviews and rejections; and general life frustrations. Just being somewhere different for a few days and researching things other than chambers’ websites, is satisfying in its attainability and as a distraction, if nothing else. Also writing a blog (albeit much less frequently than initially anticipated) has been cathartic, writing something other than work emails, indices for bundles and unconscionably late Whatsapp messages, with no printing or scanning required.

Luxembourg was the cheapest flight for July, £28 return – bargain. As it was so cheap, I invited my brother to join me. Firstly because no one else was free and/or wanted to go to Luxembourg, but mainly because he has been struggling to find a job for a few months and I thought the trip would provide him with a little relief from the day-to-day cycle of applications and rejections. Although I only booked our flights a couple of weeks before hand, that should have been enough time to find a few things to do. But sitting in the departure lounge, we realised that between us we’d amassed only a small handful of underwhelming ideas.

So when we arrive late on Saturday night, we had no real plan of what we were going to do until our flight home Monday evening. We got on a bus from the airport assuming that it went to the city centre (luckily it did), and then walked to the hotel. Maybe we ambled along less popular avenues, but we didn’t see much in the way of Saturday nightlife. The hotel wasn’t particularly central, but after a brief wander it became clear that we weren’t near anything fun, so we settled for a G&T in the hotel bar and an early night.

Breakfast was a super start to the day, an amazing auswiel of food: from goat’s cheese and little cornichons to pastries, scrambled egg and delectably crisp bacon. It was such a treat to say in a hotel, rather than sharing a room with however many random people, each morning stocking up on stodgy rye bread, processed meat, and lukewarm coffee in stained, chipped mugs (which, to be fair, does have its own charm).

For our first proper day, we walked around Luxembourg city centre. The old town was charming, with winding streets of large stone buildings, labelled with colourful signs in a variety of languages and little arches constructing connections on obscure angles. From the bock casemates (a former fort, a honeycomb-like warren of rocky passages) there was a beautiful view – below, a green valley with the ambling Alzette river, spindly black church spires spiking the skyline and music playing in a nearby courtyard, and to the right, the expanse of the historic walled city.

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The Alzette River and Bock Casemates, Luxembourg

 

We visited the Natural History Museum, which had a special cat exhibition, and also walked along the river in the sunshine to the Grund area, where we stopped at Scott’s café for some lunch. The burger was delicious, but the beer, Diekirch, distinctly average.

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A vanilla, bourbon and caramel chocospoon!

We got caught in the rain and wandered, slightly sodden, around the Notre Dame and then back into the centre of town, where we stumbled upon the Chocolate House. What a delight, a vast selection of chocospoons, from tiramisu and wasabi to lavender and chocolate brownie, and an array of milk (including lactose free cow’s milk and almond). I opted for a vanilla, bourbon and caramel spoon, and we shared the most amazing and enormous chocolate mousse cake.

 

 

After getting caught in the rain again, we explored the Bonnevoie area on the other side of town. In search of more food, we couldn’t find anything Luxembourgish so settled for a pizza. Our conclusion at the end of our first day was that Luxembourg was nice, pretty but also quite boring (despite the chocospoons), there wasn’t many people or much of a buzz, so we needed to come up with a plan of escape for the next day.

Day Two

From our strategy session over breakfast, we/I decided that we should get the train to Germany, as my brother had never been before. Trier was about an hour and a half away, with regular trains back and forth, so we went there – to the birthplaceof Karl Marx (my academic idol as a politics undergrad). Trier was pretty and has a large Roman gate at its entrance; we went to a few churches, including the Dom, meandered along the river and then visited the Karl Marx Museum. At 5:37pm, we got the train back to Luxembourg and then went straight to the airport.

 

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The Moselle River, Trier, Germany

 

We debated whether to visit the CJEU (working in law I felt particularly obliged), but decided that as it was Sunday, the Court would not have been open, so it wouldn’t be worthwhile. Instead, we waited at the airport for hours, and then even longer because our flight was delayed and then longer still, as two people decided that because of the initial delay, that they no longer wanted to get the flight, so their baggage in the hold had to be located and removed. Thanks guys.

We landed way after midnight and got home who knows when. Dragging myself into work early the next day, I see an urgent request from my colleague – to order a toilet dispense for someone in the Netherlands. What a way to start the week.

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Karl Marx
Career aspirations, Career frustrations, General ramblings, law, Life goals, London life, Pupillage, Training contract, Travel, Travel writing

Tripe, Tongue or Tobă

This week, I go on my inaugural once a month peregrination and I am so excited! A friend of mine is coming too, and as of yet, we have nothing planned except maybe a trip to a winery. From what I can glean from a quick search online, Timișoara is known as “Little Venice” as well as “the City of Flowers”, has loads of churches, was apparently the first European city to introduce horse-drawn trams and electrical street lighting, and was the first city in the Banat region to host a beer factory. It’s going to be pretty epic.

Local food is obviously important to research when learning about new countries. Some Romanian culinary highlights include: tripe soup, polenta with hot milk, cow tongue with olives and, my personal favourite, tobă also known as “head cheese”, which is apparently a pig’s stomach stuffed with pig’s feet, ears and meat from the head suspended in gelatine. But all is not lost, the desserts seem to be a much stronger category, with baklava, rahat (Turkish delight) and amandine (chocolate sponge filled with chocolate and almonds and glazed with even more chocolate), plus there’s lots of local wine and cheese to choose from. However, as I’m supposed to be abstaining from sugary stuff over Lent, and as I’m not particularly keen on tripe, tongue or tobă, it looks like I’ll have to exist solely on wine and brânză (a type of cheese, not of the head variety) – oh well.

It’s only Monday, but so far this week I’ve been rejected for two more pupillages. Both were for very good chambers and I should have known better than to have applied to them in the first place. However, again the most upsetting part of the rejection process is the lack of compassion. Today, when calling to request feedback, I was told by one of the chambers that as there where are so many applications “they just blend into one”, so as a result, it would not be possible to provide any comments whatsoever. Ironic that when drafting the applications you have to tailor them precisely to each chambers, weaving in references to their ethos, pupillage structure, key cases and the members you find most interesting, but when responding to your application, you are just another anonymous applicant, indistinguishable from a perpetual pool of other faceless failures.

My quote of the day, when asked if it was possible to move departments because I am unhappy and unfulfilled, I was told that I should not progress this any further as, “departments get protective over their paralegals” and that such a move would cause “political problems”. Given that most days I feel of very little/no worth, it is interesting to learn that my department has such a strong allegiance to me. Maybe all those degree have paid off, maybe I’m just so efficient at scanning now that they cannot imagine life without me… I’ve never felt so important, empowered and necessary in a job before, this is truly a big moment.

Adventure, Career aspirations, Career frustrations, General ramblings, law, Life goals, London life, New adventure, Pupillage, Training contract, Travel, Travel writing, Trips

BarHumBug: Thoughts and Ramblings

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I am writing this blog, I suppose, as a way to collect my thoughts and plan my future. I have been ‘trying to get into law’ for some time now, and at this point, it feels impossible and the sense of frustration and disappointed is indescribable. I want, I need, to vent these feelings and think that sharing my experiences will not only be cathartic, but will also provide an honest narrative on the less glamorous reality of law when you’re on the periphery of the profession, paralysed in perpetual paralegal perjury. It can be quite an isolating and, at least inwardly, a shameful situation to be in – seeing your peers’ progress, whilst you are seemingly standing stagnate. I also hope that writing about my experiences, if anyone actually ends up reading them, will give others in a similar situation something and someone to relate to, and, maybe, for people who are contemplating a career in law, to better inform them as to the realities of trying to get into the profession.

However, there is, as I have to keep regularly reminding myself, more to life that law; and I don’t want to just focus on that one aspect and dwell in self-pity. So, I also aim to talk about my general life in London, the coffee, the croissants, the cycling, as well as, my new perspective and experiences of the City as, of relatively recently, a singleton. Finally, and probably most interestingly and what motivated me to start a blog in the first place, is that I made a commitment to myself to travel somewhere new every month, and I want to record and share these experiences for myself and with anyone else that cares to care.

It is a completely new venture and adventure, so let’s see where it ends up.